A note from Tom Kirdahy, Sonia Friedman and Hunter Arnold

As we reflect on all that has happened in the past year both personally and professionally, we are reminded of the importance of theatre and the singular and unique nature of our beloved art form. Nothing can match the magic and power of telling stories in a shared space; of an audience, cast and crew going on a collective journey that inspires new feelings and ideas and reminds us what it means to be human.

Matthew López's THE INHERITANCE – a contemporary reimagining of E.M. Forster's novel Howards End – is a story about the generations of gay men who survived AIDS and the generations that came after. THE INHERITANCE is fundamentally about storytelling, community and connection. It's a play about survival – something we as an industry have learned a lot about this year.

It is a great honor to be nominated for
11 TONY AWARDS®,
INCLUDING BEST PLAY
.

Through the power of stagecraft and Stephen Daldry's astonishing direction, THE INHERITANCE resurrected the ghosts of our past and turned an audience of perfect strangers into a tight-knit community. As producers, we watched nightly as tissues were passed, hugs exchanged and testimonials shared. Audience members felt compelled to share their own stories about loved ones lost to AIDS. So much loss. So much pain. So much hope. We took pride as we witnessed the healing power of connection that only theatre can provide.

A Puerto Rican American making his Broadway debut, playwright Matthew López's story of a rapidly changing America transformed into something even more vibrant after the play came to New York from London. The play came home. In one breathtaking monologue, Matthew compared the insidious effects of a virus on the body's immune system to the corrosive effects of executive assault on democratic institutions.

It is impossible not to consider how prescient the play feels against the backdrop of what our community and nation are facing today.

As you know, theatre is collaborative. Our epic production would not have been possible without the extraordinary contributions of our cast and design team. Under Stephen Daldry's endlessly imaginative and elegant direction, and with the assistance of Associate Director Justin Martin, the sheer theatricality of Bob Crowley’s minimalist designs (sets and costumes) brilliantly transported us from a rent-controlled apartment on the Upper West Side to the streets of New York, a Broadway theatre, a hotel room in Alabama, a Hamptons wedding and a home for healing in upstate New York. Jon Clark's poetic lighting took us on an emotional rollercoaster with the detail and subtlety of a pointillist. Paul Englishby's original score reminded us of the power of music to conjure memories long thought buried. And Paul Arditti and Christopher Reid gave us a sound design of ingenious precision, where every word and note was crystalline and infused with deep meaning.

Of course, our cast brought the entire experience to glorious life. Like great marathon runners, our company ran the distance of a two-part epic piece. Two of our lead actors made their Broadway debuts with this production. Kyle Soller (“Eric Glass”), Samuel H. Levine (“Adam/Leo”) and rising star Andrew Burnap (“Toby Darling”) were unforgettable in their respective roles.

Our featured actors were all veterans of the stage: West End stalwart Paul Hilton made his Broadway debut (“Walter/Morgan”) and Broadway veterans John Benjamin Hickey (“Henry Wilcox”) and Lois Smith (“Margaret”) performed at the height of their craft. They were all supported by an ensemble of New York's finest actors.

We thank you for joining us around our proverbial campfire at the Barrymore. We long to do so again with all of you when the curtain rises once again on Broadway. With news of the vaccine, government support for our industry and science leading the way, we are filled with a sense of hope that in the coming year the curtain will rise again.

We look forward to being with all of you once again, doing what we love most – telling stories in shared space.

Sincerely,

Tom Kirdahy
Sonia Friedman
Hunter Arnold

 

BEST PLAY
BEST ACTOR
Andrew Burnap
BEST DIRECTOR
Stephen Daldry
BEST FEATURED ACTOR
John Benjamin Hickey
BEST FEATURED ACTOR
Paul Hilton
BEST FEATURED ACTRESS
Lois Smith
BEST SCENIC DESIGN
Bob Crowley
BEST COSTUMES
Bob Crowley
BEST LIGHTING DESIGN
John Clark
BEST SOUND DESIGN
Paul Arditti & Christopher Reid
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Paul Englishby
“TELL YOUR​
STORY BRAVELY.
IT IS A STORY WORTH
TELLING.”
Matthew López
“AN EMOTIONAL​
POWERHOUSE.
A ​ravishing theatrical work that urges generations to connect and love. Gripping from first scene to last.”
Peter Travers, Rolling Stone
“​I CHALLENGE
ANY THEATERGOER
WITH A HEART
NOT TO CRY.”
​Ben Brantley, The New York Times
“​A BIG
BROADWAY EPIC.
​Riveting, touching and absorbing with reach-for-the-tissues milestones.”
Peter Marks, The Washington Post
“​A THOUGHTFUL,
MOVING AND
FUNNY PLAY
​that will not easily be forgotten. Such ravaging emotion that the audience literally staggers out.”
Marilyn Stasio, Variety
“​THE DEPTH OF FEELING
IS RAVISHING
​and the writing utterly gorgeous. Both wonderfully funny and exquisitely poignant, this sprawling work wrecked me.”
David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter
⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑​
“​A riveting panorama of the way we live now."
Max McGuinness, The Financial Times
“​A monumental, massive production so deeply touching,
​IT DESERVES THE
HIGHEST PRAISE.”
Roma Torre, NY1